Boston Turkish Film and Music Festival5th ANNUAL BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL SM
March 30 - April 28, 2006

THE FAHIR ATAKOGLU TRIO

featuring Anthony Jackson and Horacio 'El Negro' Hernandez

 

 
 

Saturday, April 8 at 7:30 p.m.

Remis Auditorium
Museum of Fine Arts
465 Huntington Avenue, Boston

Directions

 

 
FAHIR ATAKOGLU
 
Described as "one of the outstanding pianists and composers in Europe today ... at the cutting edge of the world music" by Ahmet Ertegun of Atlantic records, Fahir Atakoglu is an international award winning composer and pianist in the fields of large symphonic works and film music. 
 
A native of Turkey, born in Istanbul,  his works have been performed in various music festivals in Europe and across North America to much acclaim, as well as in Europe and Japan. 
 
His sensitivity as a composer deeply moves the audience by his unique rhythmic, melodic and harmonic sense. His music reflects his extraordinary talent in blending different musical cultures which make his compositions speak with striking originality, and always wonderfully connected to the culture of his motherland. Since 1985, he has composed jingles, documentary and film music for many national and international productions. Following his first album in 1994, he released 8 albums in 17 countries including USA and sold over 2 million copies since.  Among his many awards is the First Prize for Documentary at the Milano Film Festival in 2000 for "Exile in Buyukada" and the Best Song Award of Mega Channel, Greece, in 2002, with Telos Dios Telos, sold over 400,000 copies.
 
In his latest CD "IF" he plays a selection of his jazz compositions, with legendary bassist Anthony Jackson and drum virtuoso Horacio 'El Negro' Hernandez, based on Turkish melodic rhythmic motifs. 

 

 
ANTHONY JACKSON  
 
Legendary bassist Anthony Jackson was born in 1952, in New York City, approximately one year after the introduction of the Fender bass. By age 12, his voracious listening habits, combined with a few years of 'poking' at the piano, evolved into a desire to play the guitar. He began to perform locally in 1966 and played on his first recording session in 1970. Two years later, he joined Billy Paul's band, receiving his first Gold Record for the hit "Me and Mrs. Jones". In 1973, he earned a writer's credit as well as an immediate reputation for his unforgettable bass line on the O'Jays hit "For the Love of Money". 
 
Over the years he played and toured with artists such as Roberta Flack, Chick Corea, Al Di Meola, and John Scofield, Lee Ritenour, Dave Grusin, Tom Scott. After 1978, he reached new technical and creative levels, resulting in some of the finest contemporary bass playing ever recorded, with diverse artists as Chaka Khan, Steely Dan, Al Di Meola, Paul Simon, Eyewitness, and Michael Camilo. In 1975, Jackson built his first contrabass guitar, an idea he conceived while in his teens. Working with successive guitar makers to improve design and playability, he finally began playing the instrument exclusively in 1982. 

 

 
HORACIO 'EL NEGRO' HERNANDEZ
 
Two-time Grammy winner Horacio 'El Negro' Hernandez was born in Havana, Cuba, in a very musical family.  He is said to be the most talented and innovative percussionist in the world, even before being awarded a Grammy in 1997. Whether performing with jazz-legends like McCoy Tyner or Michael Camilo, rock-stars like Carlos Santana and Stevie Winwood or in notable Latin American ensembles like the Tropi-Jazz All Stars of the late Tito Puente, 'El Negro' has also shown himself to be one of the most forceful and versatile musicians in the international music scene today.  
 
He is truly ambidextrous, being able to play the leading pattern with either hand or to play the basic rhythmic figure of Afro-Cuban music, the clave-beat, with his left foot on the high-hat or the cowbell with the foot-pedal, while his right foot supports the base line, and his hands quite independently play highly complex rhythms on the bongos and timbales, which he often includes, instead of the classical toms, in his drum-set. 
 
His big breakthrough outside the jazz-scene came as a percussionist in 1997 for the album Supernatural from Carlos Santana, which brought him his first Grammy Award. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 
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